|| DukeMedNews || Stress in Women

Background: Williams and his colleagues studied 152 women employed by a corporation in the Durham, N.C. area. Ninety-four women worked in customer service; the other 58 processed paperwork. The women were given confidential questionnaires measuring job stress and psychological factors. The workers reporting high levels of job strain showed higher levels of depression, anxiety, anger and hostility than their counterparts reporting lower levels of job strain. Those reporting strain also showed reduced levels of curiosity. Williams says because those factors can create health problems, any intervention that can reduce the stress associated with high job strain has the potential for immediate benefits in reduced use of costly medical services.

Suggested lead: A new study shows that if you’re a woman with a stressful job, you’re probably feeling the strain in ways that are harmful to your health. Melinda Stubbee reports.

SOQ…:60

Williams says they found that women workers who reported the highest levels of job strain in the work force they evaluated had a variety of other bad psychological and social characteristics including more hostility and anger, high levels of depression and anxiety and lower levels of social support.

Cut 1…job strain…:09 (Preview this in a AIFF or WAV file in 8 bit mono. For the full interview in high quality ISDN sound, call the newsline.)

In Cut 2 Williams explains what sort of health risks these high job stress women are more likely to face.

Cut 2…all causes…:20 (Preview this in a AIFF or WAV file in 8 bit mono. For the full interview in high quality ISDN sound, call the newsline.)