|| DukeMedNews || Duke University Health System’s Response to Hurricane Katrina

Duke to Staff Second Field Hospital in Mississippi

The National Institutes of Health has asked Duke Medicine to help staff one of 40 field hospitals being set up in response to last week’s disaster.

Duke Aids State Effort to Establish Emergency Field Hospital in Louisiana

The Duke Regional Advisory Committee (RAC)’s State Medical Assistance Team (SMAT), coordinated by the Duke Trauma Center, deployed at 6 a.m. this morning from Durham Regional Hospital.

Duke News Tip: Emergency Drug Refills for Hurricane Evacuees

Hurricane evacuees whose medication supplies are dwindling can obtain emergency refills from most pharmacies, according to pharmacy experts at Duke University Medical Center.

STAFF MEMO — UPDATE: DUKE MEDICINE SENDS VOLUNTEERS TO GULF COAST

09/06/2005

The following memo was sent on Sept. 6 to the Duke Medicine community from Victor J. Dzau, MD, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO, Duke University Health System, and William J. Fulkerson, MD, MBA, CEO, Duke University Hospital and vice president for acute care, Duke University Health System:

The National Institutes of Health has called on Duke Medicine to lend support in the disaster relief efforts for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. We have been asked to provide staffing for one of 40 field hospitals being set up in response to the disaster, and we are prepared to answer that call.

Monday afternoon, about 20 doctors, nurses and other clinicians from Duke Medicine left for Meridian, Mississippi, to help staff a U.S. government field hospital being established at Key Air Field, a National Guard post. The Duke team will serve under the direction of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This is the second medical relief effort in which Duke has been asked to participate.

At 3:00 P.M. Sunday, the first team of five nurses and technicians from Duke University Hospital and Durham Regional Hospital arrived in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, near Gulfport, as part of a larger contingent that brought a 100-bed mobile hospital to the stricken community. The Duke personnel are part of a 100-member medical team, drawn from hospitals and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agencies across North Carolina, that was dispatched to the disaster area Friday night.

A tragedy this great necessitates multifaceted action, and we are prepared to provide assistance here at home, within the walls of our own hospitals, and beyond. We are prepared to receive patients from the Gulf Coast. There is also a possibility that we will be asked to send more teams to staff field hospitals.

In preparation for possible, future deployments, if you are interested in volunteering for duty should Duke be asked to provide additional staffing, we ask that you register online at http://forms.dukehealth.org/dukehealth/gulf.nsf/Sub. At this time, we are seeking only clinician volunteers, such as physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, radiology technicians, etc. It is important to note that only employees who serve as part of Duke teams will receive pay and benefit coverage for assisting in relief efforts. Those who volunteer for disaster relief through other organizations (e.g., American Red Cross, church, etc.) will not be covered by applicable Duke and federal policies for pay and benefits coverage. Employees interested in volunteering should coordinate requests with their managers. Actual assignment will be made based on clinical requirements in the area of need, need to maintain clinical services at Duke as well as individual experience, preparedness and skills. Completion of this registration in no way guarantees that you will be deployed. If your particular skills are needed, we will contact you directly.

We are committed to working with federal agencies and our colleagues from throughout the nation, to provide care to those affected by this unprecedented event in our country’s history. By working together, we can alleviate some of the suffering that has resulted from this tragedy.

It is with the deepest sincerity that we wish to thank the many staff and faculty who worked tirelessly over the holiday weekend to make this effort happen so quickly. Specifically, we thank the 25 deployed clinicians for their unwavering dedication and willingness to serve during this unprecedented tragedy.

STAFF MEMO — UPDATE: MEDICAL RELIEF EFFORTS FOR THE GULF COAST

09/01/2005

The following memo was sent on Sept. 1 to the Duke Medicine community from Victor J. Dzau, MD, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO, Duke University Health System, and William J. Fulkerson, MD, MBA, CEO, Duke University Hospital and vice president for acute care, Duke University Health System:

On behalf of the leadership team at Duke Medicine, we want to first thank everyone who has come forward to express their concerns about what is happening on the Gulf Coast. Not unexpectedly, many of our health care team have expressed a desire to participate in relief work for the thousands of people in need of medical care. However, as you can imagine a disaster of this magnitude requires much coordination at the local, regional and national levels. We’re pleased to report that it appears that the appropriate resources are now being marshaled and that there will soon be a good assessment of what needs to be done to help get needed medical care to the affected region.

We are working with federal and state officials and are prepared to participate fully in medical relief efforts in the affected area as well as to receive patients who might be med-evac’d to hospitals throughout North Carolina. Specifically, here is what we know to date:

At the Federal Level:

The Federal Disaster Coordinating Center in NC has been activated.

It is the intent of the federal government to evacuate 2,500 patients out of the state of Louisiana. FEMA regions 4 and 6 have been activated (we are in region 4) to prepare to possibly accept these patients

The ONLY action being taken at this time in NC is the daily reporting of bed status through the NCHA reporting system which we report to.

The placement of evacuated patients will be staggered and spread out across the state; NC is at the end of the list for placement.

The VA hospital in New Orleans is in the process of being fully evacuated and those patients will likely be absorbed by the VA system.

Duke Medicine has participated in a conference call with the Secretary of Health and Human Services Michael Leavitt regarding the potential deployment of teams to field hospitals in the affected areas.

At the State/Local Level:

The Duke Regional Advisory Council (RAC) State Medical Assistance Team (SMAT) will deploy the first elements of its disaster team to the area Sept. 2-11. The Duke Medicine component of that team includes representatives from Duke Hospital, Durham Regional Hospital and Duke Health Raleigh Hospital.

The local American Red Cross chapter has indicated that there may be need for volunteers (especially to support “mass care” in the shelters). The Red Cross will begin offering free disaster training next week that is required before volunteers can travel to the Gulf Coast and must be taken in the following order:

–Thursday, September 8
9:00 a.m. to Noon — Introduction to Disaster Services
1:00 to 4:00 p.m. — Mass Care: An Overview

–Friday, September 9
9:00 to Noon — Shelter Operations
1:00 to 4:00 p.m. – Shelter Simulation

–Monday, September 12
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. – Going on a Disaster Assignment & Complete necessary paperwork.

Registration is required for all disaster training. To register, contact Blanche Hudon, Director of Volunteer Services with the Red Cross, at hudonb@usa.redcross.org. All classes will be held at the Red Cross Building at in 4737 University Drive in Durham, and participants may bring a bag lunch. Because relief efforts are still being organized, we do not know the exact number of volunteers needed at this time.

Because we anticipate receiving and caring for some patients here at Duke from the Gulf Coast area, Duke Medicine faculty and staff interested in becoming Red Cross disaster volunteers and traveling to the Gulf Coast should talk with their managers to request Paid Time Off (PTO).

Duke Medicine is collaborating with Duke University to coordinate medical relief efforts by faculty, staff and students for the Gulf Coast. A new website www.duke.edu/hurricanerelief/ is being developed to provide updated information on Duke University efforts and ways community members can offer assistance.

Of course, the way that everyone at Duke Medicine can participate in helping the residents along the is by contributing to the many service organizations that are working tirelessly to get much needed supplies to the affected region. Listed below are some of the agencies that you might want to consider donating to.

Red Cross redcross.org phone: 1-800-HELP-NOW
MAIL: Make checks payable to Central North Carolina Chapter
American Red Cross
P.O. Box 52509,
Durham 27717-2509

OR

American Red Cross
100 North Peartree Lane
Raleigh, NC 27610

The Red Cross is also asking for additional blood donations.

Salvation Army www.salvationarmyusa.org
phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY
Checks: send checks, earmarked ‘disaster relief’ to
P.O. Box 4857
Jackson, MS 39296-4857

FOODBANK of Central & Eastern North Carolina is accepting paper goods, single-serving snacks, cleaning supplies, peanut butter, single-serving meals that do not require refrigeration. Drop offs are at:
708 Gilbert Street, Durham (956-2513)
3808 Tarheel Drive, Raleigh (875-0707)

HELPING HANDS — A local organization is collecting gloves, shovels, water, toiletries and nonperishable foods to be taken into disaster areas. Donations may be dropped off at:
Helping Hand Mission
623 Rock Quarry Road in Raleigh through September 5.
Call 829-8048 for more info.

Lastly, many of you have inquired about the status of health care services in the affected region. The Healthcare Advisory Board released the attached information, but obviously, this is a very fluid situation and circumstances continue to change. We will keep you apprised of how Duke Medicine and you can help. Thank you for your concern.

STAFF MEMO — RELIEF EFFORTS FOR HURRICANE KATRINA VICTIMS

08/31/2005

The following memo was sent on Aug. 31 to the Duke Medicine community from Victor J. Dzau, MD, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO, Duke University Health System:

Our hearts go out to those who live, work and study along the Gulf Coast as we watch with dismay the absolute devastation from Hurricane Katrina. I know you join me in wanting to help those whose lives have been disrupted by the disaster. We have been in contact with the major national relief agencies and not unexpectedly, they are urging that the public make cash contributions which they can disperse where the needs are greatest.

The Federal Disaster Coordinating Center in NC has been activated, which means that hospitals (including those in our health system) across NC could possibly receive some of the 2,500 people in Louisiana alone who are in need of medical attention. Duke Medicine is also prepared to send a team of health care professionals to Louisiana as part of the State Medical Assistance Team. The team, which includes representatives from Duke Hospital, Durham Regional Hospital, and Duke Health Raleigh Hospital, is prepared to leave as early as Friday to assist in setting up a field hospital outside of New Orleans.

I know that the university is considering how best to coordinate many outreach efforts to support those affected by the hurricane and we will work closely with these plans as they develop.

For those of you who have family and friends in the affected areas, please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you and your loved ones during this difficult time. I urge every member of the Duke Medicine family to do what you can to help those whose lives have been so disrupted by this disaster.

We will keep you apprised during the coming days and weeks about our efforts to help our neighbors to the South.

|| DukeMedNews || Smallpox Backgrounder

Background Information on Smallpox
Duke Smallpox Vaccination of Employees and Essential Care Providers
Additional Information

Background Information on Smallpox

Smallpox is a serious, contagious and sometimes fatal infectious disease caused by the variola virus.

Although the disease was declared eradicated worldwide in 1980, small quantities of the smallpox virus still exist in research laboratories around the world, and security experts speculate that terrorists could acquire samples of the virus for use in an attack against the United States.

The virus is normally spread through direct face-to-face contact with infected persons, through contact with infected bodily fluids or contaminated objects including bedding or clothing. In rare cases, the virus has been spread through the air in enclosed settings such as buildings, buses or trains.

Symptoms of smallpox generally begin with high fever, head and body aches and sometimes vomiting. A rash follows that spreads and progresses to raised bumps and pus-filled blisters that crust, scab and fall off after about three weeks, leaving a pitted scar.

Smallpox proves fatal in about 30 percent of cases, although many survivors are left with permanent scarring or blindness.

There is no proven treatment for smallpox. Smallpox can be prevented by vaccination, and vaccination within three or four days of exposure to the smallpox virus will prevent the development of smallpox in most people.

Routine smallpox vaccination ended in the United States in 1972. Past experience indicates that the first dose of smallpox vaccine offers protection from smallpox for three to five years.

The smallpox vaccine is made form a virus called vaccinia that helps the body develop immunity to smallpox. The vaccine does not contain the smallpox virus and cannot give you smallpox. Historically, the vaccine has been effective in preventing smallpox infection in 95 percent of those vaccinated.

Duke Smallpox Vaccination of Employees and Essential Care Providers

In light of concerns about a potential association between smallpox vaccination and cardiac side effects, further vaccination of employees at Duke have been suspended at this time. Our primary concern in implementing the federal pre-event vaccination plan has always been the safety of our personnel. Twenty-three people at Duke University Health System have been vaccinated since late February; there have been no significant adverse events within the health system. We await the results of epidemiologic investigations and additional recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) prior to the resumption of vaccination.

For additional information concerning Duke’s plan for smallpox vaccinations, contact the Duke University Medical Center News Office at 919-684-4148.

Additional information about smallpox:

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

White House news release

Duke University Medical Center smallpox vaccine study

|| DukeMedNews || Media Kits

Background Information on Chancellor Victor Dzau, M.D.
10/04/2004

    Additional information on Victor J. Dzau, M.D., including a history of previous chancellors.

Background Information on Community Health Programs: Partners In Care
03/28/2006

    Information on the partnerships between Duke and a variety of governmental, educational and community organizations.

Background Information on Emily and Katie Benton
07/11/2005

    An overview of communications from Duke Medical Center concerning the Benton sisters.

Background Information on Peter C. Agre, M.D., Vice Chancellor for Science and Technology
01/20/2005

    Peter C. Agre, M.D., winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, will join Duke University Medical Center in July 2005 as vice chancellor for…

Background on Hydraulic Fluid
06/21/2005

    A compilation of correspondence related to hydraulic fluid issues at Duke University Health System.

Cancer Center
07/07/2004

    An overview of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center including statistics, history, program highlights and cancer facts.

Drug-coated Stents: Frequently Asked Questions
12/01/2006

    Duke cardiologists Robert M. Califf, M.D., vice chancellor for clinical research, and David F. Kong, M.D., associate professor of medicine, are two…

Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center
10/06/2006

    An overview of the Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center, including key contacts, facilities, research initiatives, program highlights and…

Duke Clinical Research Institute
01/27/2005

    Key DCRI Contacts
    Media Contact
    Web Site
    Description
    History
    Statistical Highlights
    Investigator Networks
    Selected DCRI Trials

    KEY DCRI…

Duke Health at a Glance
06/01/2006

    The Future of Medicine, Delivered Today

    Duke University Health System is a world-class health care network dedicated to providing outstanding…

|| DukeMedNews || Duke Health at a Glance

Duke Health At a Glance

Jump to: Duke University Medical Center, Historical Highlights, Administration, Department Chairs,

education * research * patient care

The youngest of the nation’s top medical centers, Duke today operates one of the country’s largest clinical and biomedical research enterprises, and works to translate advances in medical knowledge into improved patient care. Its educational programs — training hundreds of new physicians, nurses, and other health professionals each year — are regularly recognized among the nation’s very finest. It is widely recognized as the leading medical center in the Southeast, with a Health System that includes a network of hospitals, physician practices, home care services, and other providers throughout central North Carolina and beyond.

More details on medical education, research, and patient care at Duke appear below. For further information, visit the Duke University Health System Web site at dukehealth.org, or contact the News Office at 919-684-4148.

DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

Duke University Medical Center — the centerpiece of Duke’s wide-ranging medical programs — is located on the Duke University campus in Durham. The youngest of the nation’s leading medical centers, it has grown in just the past three decades from a hospital and single research building into one of the country’s largest clinical and biomedical research institutions.

As the primary entity through which our teaching, research, and patient care missions are carried out, it includes:

  • Duke University Hospital, one of the nation’s top-ranked hospitals;
  • The Private Diagnostic Clinic, PLLC, a separate but integrated organization through which our faculty physicians provide specialty, subspecialty, and primary care to more than 100,000 patients per year;
  • Duke University School of Medicine, one of the nation’s most highly regarded medical schools; the Duke University School of Nursing; graduate programs in the basic sciences; and other programs in medicine, public health policy, and the allied health professions; and
  • One of the largest biomedical research enterprises in the country, with more than $431 million in sponsored research annually, ranging from studies in genetics and molecular biology to clinical trials and health policy research.

HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHTS

1925 James B. Duke bequeaths funds to establish the Duke School of Medicine, School of Nursing, and Hospital.

1929 3,000 applicants apply to the new medical school. 70 students are selected, including four women.

1930 Duke Hospital opens July 20, 1930, attracting 25,000 visitors. Duke’s first medical students begin classes October 1.

1931 The first nursing students begin classes January 2. Duke’s Private Diagnostic Clinic opens September 15.

1957 The original Medical School and Hospital are renamed “Duke University Medical Center.”

1965 Duke establishes the nation’s first Physician Assistant Program.

1966 The Duke Medical Scientist Training Program, a joint degree program leading to both the M.D. and the Ph.D. degrees, is founded. It is one of the first three in the nation.

1980 The new $94.5 million Duke Hospital opens.

1994 The Medical Center launches a spate of construction projects, including the Levine Science Research Center, Medical Sciences Research Building, a complete renovation of Duke Clinic, additions to the Morris Building for cancer care and research, a new Children’s Health Center, a new ambulatory care building, and new parking garages.

1998 The Health System is officially created as Duke establishes partnerships with Durham Regional Hospital, Raleigh Community Hospital, and other regional health care providers.

2000 The $200-million Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy is founded. The Institute represents Duke University’s comprehensive response to the broad challenges of the Genomic Revolution.

2004 Raleigh Community Hospital changes its name to Duke Health Raleigh Hospital. Along with announcing the new name, Duke Health Raleigh Hospital introduced Wake County residents to newly expanded services including a cardiovascular center and cancer center.

ADMINISTRATION

Victor J. Dzau, M.D.
Chancellor for Health Affairs, Duke University
President and CEO, Duke University Health System

William J. Fulkerson Jr., M.D., MBA
CEO, Duke University Hospital
Vice President, Duke University Health System

Kenneth C. Morris
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, and Treasurer, Duke University Health System

Molly O’Neill
Vice Chancellor for Medical Center Integrated Planning; Vice President for Business Development and Chief Strategic Planning Officer, Duke University Health System

Asif Ahmad
Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Duke University Health System and Duke University Medical Center

R. Sanders Williams, M.D.
Dean, School of Medicine
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Catherine Lynch Gilliss, DNSc, RN
Dean, School of Nursing
Vice Chancellor for Nursing Affairs

Robert L. Taber, Ph.D.
Vice Chancellor, Corporate and Venture Development

Gordon D. Williams
Vice Chancellor for Operations; Vice President for Administration, Duke University Health System

Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D.
Vice Chancellor for Genome Sciences

DEPARTMENT CHAIRS

Anesthesiology: Mark Newman, M.D.

Biochemistry: Christian Raetz, M.D., Ph.D.

Biostatistics and Bioinformatics: William Wilkinson, Ph.D. (Acting Chair)

Cell Biology: Brigid Hogan, Ph.D.

Community and Family Medicine: James L. Michener, M.D.

Immunology: Thomas F. Tedder, Ph.D.

Medicine: Harvey J. Cohen, M.D. (Interim)

Molecular-Genetics and Microbiology: Joseph R. Nevins, Ph.D.

Neurobiology: James McNamara, M.D.

Obstetrics and Gynecology: Haywood Brown, M.D.

Ophthalmology: David L. Epstein, M.D.

Pathology: Salvatore Pizzo, M.D.

Pediatrics: Joseph St. Geme, III, M.D.

Pharmacology and Cancer Biology: Anthony R. Means, Ph.D.

Psychiatry: Ranga R. Krishnan, M.B, Ch.B.

Radiation Oncology: Christopher G. Willett, M.D.

Radiology: Carl E. Ravin, M.D.

Surgery: Danny O. Jacobs, M.D.

Duke News – Print

SAN FRANCISCO — It was the tragic, sudden death of Olympic skater Sergei Grinkov that triggered Pascal Goldschmidt’s quest to solve the intricate genetic puzzle of heart disease.

The Russian Grinkov and his wife, Ekaterina Gordeeva, had won two Olympic gold medals, four world championships and three European championships. Parents of a beautiful 4-year-old daughter, Daria, the couple exuded health and vitality.

But on Nov. 20, 1995, at the age of 28, Grinkov died suddenly of a massive heart attack, collapsing while in the middle of a practice session.

For cardiologist Dr. Pascal Goldschmidt, now chief of cardiology at Duke University Medical Center, this unexpected death didn’t seem to make sense, at least on the surface. Grinkov’s father died at the age of 52 of a heart attack, and like his son had none of the risk factors associated with heart disease. Yet on autopsy, he was found to have severe coronary artery disease.

“Sergei had none of the risks we associate with heart disease, such as smoking, diabetes, old age, being sedentary, high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol levels,” Goldschmidt said. “There had to be something else going on.”

While at Johns Hopkins University, Goldschmidt tested a sample of Grinkov’s blood and found that he had a variation of the P1A2 gene — carried by about 20 percent of the population — which seems to predispose people to early heart disease. The normal gene is involved in platelet formation, and it appears that those people with this specific variant possess platelets that clump together too easily.

“While environmental factors are important in the development of heart disease, they aren’t the only factors,” Goldschmidt continued. “There is a multitude of different gene variants that might come into play in combination with different environmental factors to produce heart disease. It is a very complex process.”

To help unravel the complicated and subtle interplay of genes and the environment, Goldschmidt is leading a team of Duke cardiologists, geneticists and statisticians in a unique effort to better understand the genetic underpinnings of atherosclerosis. They are drawing on more than 30 years of clinical data collected by Duke cardiologists on all the heart patients seen at Duke, giving researchers an unprecedented trove of information about the progression of the disease and how patients respond to different treatments.

The researchers are now adding a genetics component to this rich data resource, performing genetic analyses on samples taken from the patients. For example, since early this year, they have collected more than 700 blood samples of patients undergoing angioplasty at Duke. As the project accumulates data, Goldschmidt and his team hope to be able to determine which patients will do better with certain drugs.

“We currently send these patients home taking five different drugs,” Goldschmidt said. “However, for any given individual, we don’t know which drugs, or combination of drugs, are helping the patient. Ultimately, we want to be able to conduct a genetic test and then be able to rationally determine which drugs that individual should be taking to prevent future heart attacks.”

To better prevent and treat atherosclerosis, Goldschmidt believes that researchers must first better understand the natural progression of the disease. To that end, they have embarked on an ambitious and unique project to analyze tissues from atherosclerotic patients.

“In collaboration with our heart surgeons, we are collecting and analyzing aortas from heart transplant donors,” he explained. The aorta — the main artery that carries oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the rest of the body — is one of the main sites of the artherosclerotic process. “When the surgeons retrieve the heart from transplant, they remove the aorta as well and send it quickly to our laboratory.”

Since the project began earlier this year, the researchers have conducted detailed genetic analysis of more than 55 of these “fresh” aortas. To date, they are tracking the “expression, ” or activity, of 83 different genes that appear to provide resistance or susceptibility to atherosclerosis.

As the collection of analyzed aortic tissue grows, researchers will have complete aortas that span the entire spectrum of vessel health ? ranging from aortas that are completely disease-free to those riddled with artery-clogging fatty plaques, and every stage of the disease in between.

“There are many genes involved, some that seem to protect individuals from atherosclerosis and some that seem to predispose them to the disease,” Goldschmidt said. “Once we get a handle on the natural progression of the disease ? which genes are turned on or off and when ? we can better know when and where to intervene.”

“Without a strong and talented team that offers a unique richness of expertise, talent and dedication that cuts across many specialties and disciplines at Duke, this ambitious effort could not be successful,” Goldschmidt said.

“Such genomic studies are not likely to help the individual patients being studied, but they will certainly offer life-giving treatments for generations to come,” he said. “For example, while a better understanding of the genetics of atherosclerosis unfortunately can’t help Sergei, hopefully we’ll be able to help people like Daria.”

|| DukeMedNews || Print

Suggested lead: A new procedure for lung surgery shows promise in getting patients back on their feet faster than ever. Tom Britt has more.

Cut 1…SOQ…: 60 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 6-bit mono.)

Surgeons at several locations around the country are reporting remarkable success with a new procedure that leaves a smaller scar, causes less damage and helps speed recovery for lung cancer patients. The procedure is called ‘thorascopy.’ It requires only a small, 4.5 centimeter incision — roughly two inches. Through this tiny incision, surgeons can remove an entire lobe of the patient’s lung. Duke University Medical Center thoracic surgeon Dr. Thomas D’Amico says surgeons no longer need to cut across muscle and spread or break the patient’s ribs to remove the lung.

“The potential advantages are earlier discharge from the hospital, less overall post-operative pain, less requirement for narcotics to treat the pain, earlier return to physical activity and the potential for an overall superior result based on the fact that it’s less stress to the patients.”

D’Amico says the new procedure allows patients to go home only a couple of days after surgery, while traditional methods require a hospital stay of seven to 10 days. I’m Tom Britt.

D’Amico says lung cancer patients of any age or overall health could be candidates for the new procedure, as long as their cancer has not spread to other areas of the body.

Cut 2…approach…:12 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 16-bit mono. )

“The smaller the tumor the better, but with improvement in screening techniques, more and more patients are going to come in at an earlier stage and are going to be candidates for this minimally invasive approach.”

|| DukeMedNews || Print

Suggested lead: A new procedure for lung surgery shows promise in getting patients back on their feet faster than ever. Tom Britt has more.

Cut 1…SOQ…: 60 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 6-bit mono.)

Surgeons at several locations around the country are reporting remarkable success with a new procedure that leaves a smaller scar, causes less damage and helps speed recovery for lung cancer patients. The procedure is called ‘thorascopy.’ It requires only a small, 4.5 centimeter incision — roughly two inches. Through this tiny incision, surgeons can remove an entire lobe of the patient’s lung. Duke University Medical Center thoracic surgeon Dr. Thomas D’Amico says surgeons no longer need to cut across muscle and spread or break the patient’s ribs to remove the lung.

“The potential advantages are earlier discharge from the hospital, less overall post-operative pain, less requirement for narcotics to treat the pain, earlier return to physical activity and the potential for an overall superior result based on the fact that it’s less stress to the patients.”

D’Amico says the new procedure allows patients to go home only a couple of days after surgery, while traditional methods require a hospital stay of seven to 10 days. I’m Tom Britt.

D’Amico says lung cancer patients of any age or overall health could be candidates for the new procedure, as long as their cancer has not spread to other areas of the body.

Cut 2…approach…:12 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 16-bit mono. )

“The smaller the tumor the better, but with improvement in screening techniques, more and more patients are going to come in at an earlier stage and are going to be candidates for this minimally invasive approach.”

|| DukeMedNews || Print

Suggested lead: A new procedure for lung surgery shows promise in getting patients back on their feet faster than ever. Tom Britt has more.

Cut 1…SOQ…: 60 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 6-bit mono.)

Surgeons at several locations around the country are reporting remarkable success with a new procedure that leaves a smaller scar, causes less damage and helps speed recovery for lung cancer patients. The procedure is called ‘thorascopy.’ It requires only a small, 4.5 centimeter incision — roughly two inches. Through this tiny incision, surgeons can remove an entire lobe of the patient’s lung. Duke University Medical Center thoracic surgeon Dr. Thomas D’Amico says surgeons no longer need to cut across muscle and spread or break the patient’s ribs to remove the lung.

“The potential advantages are earlier discharge from the hospital, less overall post-operative pain, less requirement for narcotics to treat the pain, earlier return to physical activity and the potential for an overall superior result based on the fact that it’s less stress to the patients.”

D’Amico says the new procedure allows patients to go home only a couple of days after surgery, while traditional methods require a hospital stay of seven to 10 days. I’m Tom Britt.

D’Amico says lung cancer patients of any age or overall health could be candidates for the new procedure, as long as their cancer has not spread to other areas of the body.

Cut 2…approach…:12 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 16-bit mono. )

“The smaller the tumor the better, but with improvement in screening techniques, more and more patients are going to come in at an earlier stage and are going to be candidates for this minimally invasive approach.”

|| DukeMedNews || Print

Suggested lead: A new procedure for lung surgery shows promise in getting patients back on their feet faster than ever. Tom Britt has more.

Cut 1…SOQ…: 60 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 6-bit mono.)

Surgeons at several locations around the country are reporting remarkable success with a new procedure that leaves a smaller scar, causes less damage and helps speed recovery for lung cancer patients. The procedure is called ‘thorascopy.’ It requires only a small, 4.5 centimeter incision — roughly two inches. Through this tiny incision, surgeons can remove an entire lobe of the patient’s lung. Duke University Medical Center thoracic surgeon Dr. Thomas D’Amico says surgeons no longer need to cut across muscle and spread or break the patient’s ribs to remove the lung.

“The potential advantages are earlier discharge from the hospital, less overall post-operative pain, less requirement for narcotics to treat the pain, earlier return to physical activity and the potential for an overall superior result based on the fact that it’s less stress to the patients.”

D’Amico says the new procedure allows patients to go home only a couple of days after surgery, while traditional methods require a hospital stay of seven to 10 days. I’m Tom Britt.

D’Amico says lung cancer patients of any age or overall health could be candidates for the new procedure, as long as their cancer has not spread to other areas of the body.

Cut 2…approach…:12 . . . ( Preview this in a WAV file in 16-bit mono. )

“The smaller the tumor the better, but with improvement in screening techniques, more and more patients are going to come in at an earlier stage and are going to be candidates for this minimally invasive approach.”

Duke News – Email

DURHAM, N.C. – Physician-scientists from Duke University Medical Center will present the latest in cardiology and genetics, osteoporosis, integrative medicine and other health topics during the 8th annual Duke Palm Beach Forum, Friday, March 2, at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in West Palm Beach. The theme of this year’s forum is “Living the Good Life.”

Leading the panel of speakers is Dr. Ralph Snyderman, chancellor for health affairs and president and CEO of the Duke University Health System. Joining him will be Dr. Pascal Goldschmidt, Duke’s chief of cardiology, and Dr. Tracy Gaudet, associate director of the new Duke Center for Integrative Medicine.

Snyderman, a member of the Governing Council of the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine, will talk on “The Future of Medicine.” He is an award-winning researcher in the fields of immunology and rheumatology and recently completed a term as chair of the Council of Deans for the Association of American Medical Colleges. Snyderman will outline a number of major initiatives under way at Duke, including a recently announced $200 million campus-wide investment in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy.

Following Snyderman’s talk, Goldschmidt will speak on “Longevity, Heart Disease, and Your Gene Pool.” He will discuss how genes determine individual heart health and what you can do to maximize your cardiovascular health and quality of life.

Gaudet will give the luncheon program, titled, “Beyond Medicine: The Mind, Body, Spirit Approach to Wellness.” Prior to moving to Duke, she led the development of the nation’s first comprehensive academic integrative medicine program at the University of Arizona.

Small group workshops will feature Dr. Ann Brown, Duke assistant professor of medicine, on osteoporosis; Dr. David Epstein, Duke chairman of ophthalmology, on vision loss; and Dr. Farshid Guilak, associate professor of surgery at Duke, on living tissue replacements to repair and rejuvenate bones and major organs.

“Duke is pleased to be able to bring some of our preeminent faculty members to share valuable health information with our friends in Palm Beach,” said Snyderman. “New developments in genomics, molecular biology, immunology and in our understanding of the role of mind, body and spirit in human health promise to profoundly advance the way we practice medicine in the new millennium. Duke is at the forefront of this revolution in health care, and it is our mission to share this knowledge with people throughout the Southeast.”

Each year, a number of prominent couples in the Palm Beach community sponsor the Duke forum. This year’s sponsors include Harold and Barbara Bell, Ruth and Herman Albert, Roslyn and Milton Lachman, Richard and Pat Johnson, and Ed and Gladys Benenson.